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Wireless orbiTouch Now Available

wireless orbiTouch keyboard

orbiTouch Wireless is available in white (not shown).


We are excited to announce the availability of the Wireless orbiTouch Keyless Keyboard

OrbiTouch Wireless resembles it’s predecessor, the original orbiTouch, on all levels except one–we’ve eliminated the cord. Through customer feedback, we’ve been able to create an orbiTouch that is wireless, efficient, and powerful. The orbiTouch Wireless is battery powered and works with a wireless USB receiver. If you would like to know more about orbiTouch Keyless Keyboard, you are invited to read Testimonials, Research and Reviews.

Features and benefits of orbiTouch Wireless:

Increased flexibility and mobility

Users are no longer confined to cord length. The new orbiTouch wireless can be conveniently mounted onto a wheelchair.

Increased comfort

Not only does orbiTouch’s unique design take the pain out of typing, but the user can now recline in their favorite chair and use a computer comfortably from anywhere in the room.

Works with a variety of special needs

OrbiTouch Keyless Keyboard has a broad range of applications, such as hand and finger injury, arthritis, carpal tunnel, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, muscular dystrophy, and autism.

The team at orbiTouch would love to connect with you. To order your Wireless orbiTouch today, please visit our Products page. If you would like to get in touch, please contact us via the form below or call today at 1.888.385.1936.


OrbiTouch Keyless Keyboard: Breaking Barriers

The following is an excerpt from an guest blog post featured on the special education technology blog Teaching All Students that follows the orbiTouch experience of a young man and his mother. A big thanks to Patrick Black, blog creator, for featuring us!

Devin Spangler was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome when he was 7 years old. When you sit down with Devin, now 13, it is evident he is an articulate and bright young man. In fact, he speaks more clearly and cogently than many adults. However, according to his mother Allie, self-expression hasn’t always been easy. 

Only years earlier, completing school work was a daily battle. Devin became increasingly reluctant to handwrite school assignments because his hands would fatigue quickly. Standard keyboards didn’t go over much better–their QWERTY layout seemingly had no order, something individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder crave. OrbiTouch helped him break through communication barriers. This is Allie and Devin Spangler’s orbiTouch story. 

Questions For Devin:

Which features about orbiTouch did you like best? For example, alphabetical order, corresponding colors with characters, comfortable design, etc.?

Well, personally my favorites, or my top three favorites, are alphabetical order, comfortable design, and I love the mouse. The fact that it has a mouse in it. It just makes it less cluttered. You have a desk and an orbiTouch. It makes it easier to have it all there.

Did using orbiTouch make typing more comfortable?

I think using the orbiTouch actually led me into typing more. Now, I’m writing five paragraph essays and the whole nine yards.

Before orbiTouch, when you would sit down at a computer, what kind of feelings did you experience? After using orbiTouch?

Well, before the orbiTouch, I would experience the feeling of discomfort, unhappiness. It was very tedious, like math. After the orbiTouch, it was better. I felt a little more comfortable approaching a keyboard, because I knew how it really worked, the basics of typing. The keyless keyboard led me into typing.

Questions For Allie: 

Did you see Devin change the way he viewed computer use after using orbiTouch? What kind of emotions, as a parent, did you experience?

Absolutely, I did. I immediately saw that spark and that love of learning come back. Because we were getting to the point where he was losing that zest for learning because it was becoming so tedious, having to sit there and type on a keyboard. Physically writing is very difficult for him. It still is til this day.

He has low muscle tone in his fingers so when he writes, everything gets tired. And it’s painful. It gets up all the way up into his shoulders. So we had to find an alternative. His first grade teacher was fantastic. She was open to allowing him to use different forms of technology in the classroom.

For the entirety of this article, please visit http://teachingall.blogspot.com/2011/12/guest-post-orbitouch-keyless-keyboard.html

OrbiTouch Review: International Test and Evaluation Association

Up, down, left, right and into the corners. These are simple yet powerful words that are part of the context of a central Florida company located in the city of Maitland called Blue Orb, Inc. The words are associated with their uniquely U.S. designed, patented and manufactured technology tool called the orbiTouch®. It is an innovative, ergonomically honed keyboard that does not require the use of fingers or handwrist agility needed for a QWERTY keyboard and mouse.

A first look at the orbiTouch® keyboard causes you to wonder how any manner of typing is accomplished. However, it is as real and functional as a standard keyboard and mouse. The convincing moment comes when you actually try it out. There is one thing in particular that the orbiTouch® can do you wouldn’t normally think possible from a technology tool.

Hearing about or observing the transformation that takes place for adults and children who use the orbiTouch® keyboard can be a heartfelt experience, not only for the user but for amazed family and friends.

The driving force that creates such an experience stems from a passion to push the envelope for Internet accessibility and computer use. Envelope pushing that builds community, learning and independence for people who have disabilities such as cerebral palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome, arthritis, prosthetic hands, or other types of limiting physical conditions. Individuals who are visually impaired, blind, have autism or traumatic brain injury have benefited from the orbiTouch® keyboard. It also enables people with no disabilities or non limiting conditions to find greater comfort by learning a new way of typing that can help avoid injuries or developing painful conditions associated with traditional keyboard typing.

For the entire article written by Elizabeth Hood of the Central Florida Chapter of ITEA, please visit www.facetpm.com/uploads/orbiTouch_article.pdf

OrbiTouch: Get back to work

This might be a gross generalization, but let me say it anyway: We all, at one time or another, have complained about work. The themes are largely the same: An overbearing boss, piles of papers, inundated email inboxes, to-do lists that seem to never end. If you’ve ever been to the point where you’re pulling your hair out in frustration, you know what I’m talking about.

But what if you couldn’t work due to injury or disability? In the midst of a frenetic 9 to 5 buzz, we tend to take for granted the satisfaction we gain from an honest day’s work. The sense of pride from making your own money and feeling fulfilled in your life’s purpose. It’s the self-esteem that comes from being an active participant in the creation of your own life’s course.

That’s where assistive technology like orbiTouch comes in.  Assistive technology, such as alternative keyboards, hearing aids, touch pads, and speech generators, help bridge the productivity gap.

In a blog article posted earlier this year, John M. Williams discusses the transformation that takes place when you take a motivated individual with autism combined with the empowerment that comes with using a keyboard like orbiTouch.

Twenty-year-old Catherine Grace Zeh is a high functioning individual with autism. A graduate of Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA, in June 2000, Zeh loves working with computers. In fact, she just loves working. She dreams of returning to work in an office where she can utilize her computer skills and general administrative skills.

“I have the ability to work and want very much to work full time,” says Zeh who is determined to succeed. One of her immediate goals is to work fulltime so she can travel to Europe soon with family or friends. Her burning desire is to visit Italy where she can see all the wonderful sights of Rome and ride on the canals of Venice. Working sporadically, Zeh feels as though her abilities are being wasted. She is looking for a full time job. After dozens of interviews without success, she is optimistic she will find one. She is certain the orbiTouch will play an important role in her career.

John M. Williams wrote another article on the orbiTouch, this time recounting his experience when Sean Grassley, a man with cerebral palsy living in Michigan, tries orbiTouch for the first time.

For the first time in his life, without assistance from anyone, 35-year-old Shawn had typed his name. For the fist time in his life, [Shawn] Grassley said, “I feel empowered. I want to continue.”

Grassley is intelligent. He knows what he wants and says what he wants. He told me, “I want to use this keyboard so I can access the Internet. I want to write e-mails. I want to write letters.”

 More importantly, he wants to work. He wants to be independent. He says, “I want to earn my own money and be my own man.”

Assistive technology like orbiTouch helps open an entire world of information for a population that regularly feels isolated from technology and society as a whole.  Writing emails, instant messaging, and posting on social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter are not only crucial in social interaction, but necessary for business interaction as well.  Ability to operate a keyboard makes this interaction possible.

While many of us fantasize of the day we can retire, we can see through these testimonials many individuals with disabilities dream of the day they are able to work and earn money. In fact, it is remarkable how many individuals with disabilities want to work–and could work–given the right tools.

OrbiTouch: Shawn Grassley Discovers A New World Through Assistive Technology

You had to be there to capture the moment. It was more than a Kodak moment for Shawn Grassley. It was a moment of joy beyond description. It was an exhilarating moment of liberation when Grassley looked up and saw he had spelled his name using the orbiTouch keyless keyboard.

I was attending the Helping Hands 20th Annual Telethon in Hazleton, Pennsylvania, on April 26. Hundreds of people were in the studio. Telephones were ringing. Voices were everywhere. Hundreds of eyes were focused on the master of ceremonies, who was making an impassioned plea for donations. In the center of all of this exuberance however, one set of eyes was focused on two domes. Shawn was sitting in his wheelchair, his head bent over the domes. His hands moved the domes forward and backward, left and right, and in other directions. His focus was like a laser beam. He eyes moved left and right and up and down as he moved the domes one at a time. First the letter S appeared. Then H. After two tries A was on the screen. Then two tries later W and finally N. Grassley moved his eyes upward and his head was rigid as he saw his name. Then came the look of triumphant victory. There was the smile. There was the shouting, “I did it. I am not a dummy.”

Very few moments have ever affected me like this one.

For the first time in his life, without assistance from anyone, 35-year-old Shawn had typed his name. For the fist time in his life, Grassley said, “I feel empowered. I want to continue.”

Continue he did. Slowly Grassley typed G. Then R, A, S S L E Y. Nothing Grassley did before in his life prepared him for this time as he read GRASSLEY. He had triumphed again. He was a man with renewed confidence. For the second time in less than five minutes he said, “I can write. I can write. I can speak. I am not a dummy.” Grassley created a keystroke by sliding the two domes into one of their eight respective positions.

When I asked his jubilant mother, Sandy, “Why does he say, ‘I am not a dummy?’” She said with bitterness, “His caseworkers and some of his former school teachers called him a dummy because of his cerebral palsy, and because he could not use a regular keyboard. He is not a dummy!”

Grassley is intelligent. He knows what he wants and says what he wants. He told me, “I want to use this keyboard so I can access the Internet. I want to write e-mails. I want to write letters.”

More importantly, he wants to work. He wants to be independent. He says, “I want to earn my own money and be my own man.” Grassley’s jubilance was shared by others. John Seamon, the executive director of Helping Hands, could not believe what he had just seen. A person he had known for more than 20 years, had in Seamon’s words, “surprised me beyond my expectations.”

Seamon wanted the orbiTouch keyboard. He has been looking for a device to help Grassley communicate, and now he grabbed it, saying with a tear, “I can not describe what I am feeling. I am speechless. This tool is the embodiment of what assistive technology was designed to accomplish for users.” Grassley’s story does not end there. He learned to use the keyboard in minutes, and kept it for some time. He smiled, laughed, and delighted in his new-found power of expression. He said triumphantly, “I can write.”

Grassley is getting an orbiTouch of his own. He knows it will change his life. He knows he has discovered the great equalizer for him. Thanks to technology, he is ready to move forward with his life.

– John M. Williams, Assistive Technology Writer 

Communication Without Barriers: The orbiTouch® Keyless Keyboard For Persons With Autism

It’s been a while since we’ve done a post on how orbiTouch can be used by autistic individuals, and well, it’s time for a change up.  The following article was written by John M. Williams, an assistive technology writer and blogger who founded the website Assistive Technology News.  In this article, Williams recounts his experience with the orbiTouch, and in particular, watching a young, highly functioning autistic adult gain independence by using orbiTouch.

Original Article:

Catherine Zeh sits in front of her desk with her Hewlett Packard PC sitting on the desktop. She is preparing to input information onto a page. In front of her is a plastic sheet showing her various directions to move the two domes on the orbiTouch keyless keyboard in front of her. Resting comfortably with the keyboard at arm’s level, she starts typing. “There is no finger motion involved in using the orbiTouch. I just move the two domes in different directions and I am typing,” says Zeh with a strong sense of pride and accomplishment. She says she likes using the orbiTouch because there is less finger and wrist motion, and she can sit longer spells without being tired.

Ten minutes later, she has typed 303 words in four paragraphs. A spell check review shows she typed nine words incorrectly. Still, her periods, question marks, quotations, spacing between lines and paragraph indentation are flawless. Before she started today’s work she had not used the orbiTouch in close to four weeks. She believes her efficiency rate and typing speed would be higher if she had used the orbiTouch during those four weeks. Almost three of those four weeks were spent vacationing with her parents and then grandparents. Twenty-year-old Catherine Grace Zeh is a high functioning individual with autism. A graduate of Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA, in June 2000, Zeh loves working with computers. In fact, she just loves working. She dreams of returning to work in an office where she can utilize her computer skills and general administrative skills. Her software experience includes working with Data Entry Speed 8000 KPH, Microsoft Word, Access, Excel, PowerPoint and CPC 700 Closed Captioning Software. She enjoys filing, web researching and perhaps captioning once again. She was a Closed Captioning Editor from July 2000 to December 2000, for Fairfax County Public Schools, Chapel Square Center, Annandale, VA. She did transcription from audio and written scripts. However, she does not want to do captioning full time “Captioning full time is tedious and tiring because your fingers are moving all the time,” she says.

Returning to the orbiTouch she says, “The orbiTouch can be used by people who caption. After 30minutes of captioning, especially in real-time, your fingers are awfully tired, and your back aches,” says Zeh.

Zeh’s typing speed is 50 words per minute. With the orbiTouch it is 30. With more usage, she believes she can reach 40. Aware of repetitive stress injuries resulting from too much typing, she believes the orbiTouch can reduce injuries because, “there is no finger and wrist motion.” Zeh says it took her five hours to learn to use the orbiTouch to where she was typing more than 20 words per minute. Some people with autism have an ability to memorize songs, dates, facts and other information that they can recall instantly. According to Zeh, initially sitting in front of a computer for about two hours with the combinations chart in front of her, she memorized about 60% of the combinations of movements. She believes she knows more than 75% of the letter combinations and half of the other combinations.

“I have the ability to work and want very much to work full time,” says Zeh who is determined to succeed. One of her immediate goals is to work fulltime so she can travel to Europe soon with family or friends. Her burning desire is to visit Italy where she can see all the wonderful sights of Rome and ride on the canals of Venice. Working sporadically, Zeh feels as though her abilities are being wasted. She is looking for a full time job. After dozens of interviews without success, she is optimistic she will find one. She is certain the orbiTouch will play an important role in her career.

Her one wish for the orbiTouch is, “I would like to see a smaller version,” she says. By smaller she means a thumbs version. She thinks a smaller version will attract more people with autism to become users because using their thumbs will hold their attention.

She has told her friends about the orbiTouch and believes it can play educational, recreational and career roles in the lives of people with autism. Zeh, who weighs her words carefully before speaking says, “The orbiTouch gives individuals with autism a voice in the information technology field.” Zeh adds, “The orbiTouch is a communications tool. Since it can enhance my communications, it can help other people with autism to communicate.”

OrbiTouch and Wounded Veterans

The induction of Medal of Honor recipient Sergeant First Class Leroy Petry on Wednesday got me thinking about orbiTouch’s involvement with the military. SFC Petry knows the true meaning of sacrifice–he lost his hand in Pakyta, Afghanistan, after saving two fellow Army Rangers from a live enemy grenade.  While Petry’s actions are nothing short of heroic, his life will be irrevocably changed as he learns to assimilate to life using a prosthesis.

SFC Petry, along with thousands of other military veterans who now use a prosthesis, must learn how to acclimate to a new life where keyboard use is intrinsically different. Products like orbiTouch aim to address this difference.

A couple of months ago, we sent one of our orbiTouch units to Ft. Bliss, Texas, so the staff operating the Warrior Transition Unit could evaluate our product.  Here’s what SSG Roy Havens, Squad Leader to assist Wounded Warriors, had to say:

“Given the nature of our Wounded Warriors transitioning through the Warrior Transition Battalion here in Fort Bliss Texas, the OrbiTouch is a useful asset to Soldiers with debilitative arm and hand injuries and motor functions.”

We were thrilled by this early positive feedback.

Because in a digital age, the inability to use a computer is synonymous with losing your voice. orbiTouch is a tool that can open up immense possibilities for those transitioning to post-military life.

Just think about job search, for instance. Writing resumes, researching prospective employers, composing emails, and networking through Facebook and LinkedIn are all things that can be done using orbiTouch.  If using a standard keyboard is difficult for you because you have limited hand mobility, orbiTouch may be the answer for you.

The kind of feedback we received from Ft. Bliss is crucial to making this product the best it can be. IIf you are a military veteran or organization, and would like to try orbiTouch for free, please email elizabeth@orbiTouch.com or find us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/orbitouch